Companies involved in global supply chain services are becoming increasingly interested in blockchain technology and how the use of this technology can enhance efficiency and security within the supply chain. Blockchain-based applications have enormous potential to transform transportation and logistics operations in the United States and worldwide.

Last month at Transparency 18 in Atlanta, approximately 40 companies performed demonstrations for supply chain stakeholders from around the world exhibiting how software using blockchain and other disruptive technologies could enhance supply chain efficiency. In addition to private stakeholders, government agencies, such as various customs authorities, have expressed interest in using blockchain technology as a foundational element for more robust trusted trader programs and improved risk management systems.


Continue Reading GDPR’s Impact on the Use of Blockchain to Facilitate International Trade

The SEC Division of Investment Management recently published a letter to the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA) addressing the interest among sponsors in offering registered funds that would hold cryptocurrencies and cryptocurrency-related products. The Division emphasized that flexibility to innovate is a key feature of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”) and reiterated that the Division seeks to “foster innovation that benefits investors and preserves the important protections that Congress established in the 1940 Act.”1 The Division noted, however, that cryptocurrencies and related products are in many ways unlike the types of investments typically held by registered funds, and, as a result, there are a number of investor protection issues that need to be addressed before sponsors begin offering investments in cryptocurrency-holding funds to retail investors.

Continue Reading SEC Addresses Cryptocurrency Holdings by Registered Funds

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) recently announced a shift in its policies for enforcing federal marijuana laws in states where marijuana has been decriminalized or legalized. Notwithstanding this shift, however, the DOJ is unlikely to begin prosecuting marijuana growers and distributors who are operating in compliance with state law. So where will the feds go now? The DOJ will likely prosecute the most egregious violators of state law which means that the stakes are higher for those individuals and companies. The worst offenders of the state regimes now face not only state penalties, but the risk of enforcement by federal authorities, who have more investigative resources and can seek much more extensive and severe penalties.

Continue Reading What Is the Significance of the DOJ’s Change in Marijuana Enforcement Policies?